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Understanding aggression and Alzheimer's disease

Although many caregivers find memory loss to be one of the hardest aspects of Alzheimer's disease to cope with, heightened aggression is also a common side effect of dementia. If you're concerned about the mental health or cognitive decline in someone you know or care for, you might already be considering helping them move into an assisted living community. While this is can be a very effective way of helping a loved one living with dementia, it's important to understand what causes some people to become aggressive as their condition worsens.

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Are you at risk of glaucoma?

It's normal for your eyesight to worsen a little with age, but many older people confuse symptoms of age-related macular degeneration with the warning signs of glaucoma.

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Exploring the science behind slips, trips and falls

For elderly people, slips, trips and falls present a serious health risk. A fractured hip or broken bone can be life-threatening in some cases, and unfortunately, these kind of injuries are all too common among older people. Until now, some doctors assumed that older individuals' reduced muscle strength and balance were responsible for these incidents, but new research by scientists in the United States could indicate a different cause for slips, trips and falls among elderly people.

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Music can help in dementia treatment

For families affected by Alzheimer's disease, optimism can be hard to come by. With no known cure, severe dementia can be a debilitating illness, and for some families, the prospect of an ageing loved one gradually losing their mental faculties can be too much to bear. Fortunately, there are some treatments that have shown promise for treating Alzheimer's and similar conditions, and the use of music in some therapies has proven rather effective.

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Recognising the signs of depression

Everyone feels a little low from time to time, but many people confuse feeling sad with depression. For individuals suffering from this debilitating condition, the comparison couldn't be further from the truth, and depression is a serious illness that needs to be treated. Many older people experience depression, particularly following significant life changes like having to move into an assisted living community. It's important to recognise the symptoms of depression and intervene before the condition worsens.

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Don't ignore early symptoms of Alzheimer's disease

As people age, it's normal for them to become a little more forgetful. It's easy to dismiss the odd instance of absent-mindedness as nothing more than a side effect of getting on a bit, but according to scientists and dementia researchers who gathered at an international Alzheimer's disease conference in America, frequent memory lapses could be the early warning signs of dementia, reports US broadcaster NBC News.

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Researchers discover connection between high blood sugar, dementia

There are many risk factors associated with a person's likelihood of developing dementia. For years, scientists have speculated that everything from poor diet to a lack of exercise could be partially responsible for the onset of cognitive decline. Until now, a definitive connection between some health conditions and dementia has remained elusive. However, the New York Times reports that researchers in the United States believe they have identified a possible connection between high blood sugar and dementia.

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Dementia cases on the decline across the UK

Dementia is one of the most difficult conditions for families, caregivers and elderly people to deal with. Memory loss can rob people of their very identity and make communicating with friends and loved ones very challenging. When elderly people begin to exhibit symptoms of dementia, the best course of action is often to help them move into an assisted living community. Fortunately, according to new research, overall rates of new dementia cases appear to be declining across the UK.

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