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Understanding aggression and Alzheimer's disease

Although many caregivers find memory loss to be one of the hardest aspects of Alzheimer's disease to cope with, heightened aggression is also a common side effect of dementia. If you're concerned about the mental health or cognitive decline in someone you know or care for, you might already be considering helping them move into an assisted living community. While this is can be a very effective way of helping a loved one living with dementia, it's important to understand what causes some people to become aggressive as their condition worsens.

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Music can help in dementia treatment

For families affected by Alzheimer's disease, optimism can be hard to come by. With no known cure, severe dementia can be a debilitating illness, and for some families, the prospect of an ageing loved one gradually losing their mental faculties can be too much to bear. Fortunately, there are some treatments that have shown promise for treating Alzheimer's and similar conditions, and the use of music in some therapies has proven rather effective.

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Don't ignore early symptoms of Alzheimer's disease

As people age, it's normal for them to become a little more forgetful. It's easy to dismiss the odd instance of absent-mindedness as nothing more than a side effect of getting on a bit, but according to scientists and dementia researchers who gathered at an international Alzheimer's disease conference in America, frequent memory lapses could be the early warning signs of dementia, reports US broadcaster NBC News.

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Researchers discover connection between high blood sugar, dementia

There are many risk factors associated with a person's likelihood of developing dementia. For years, scientists have speculated that everything from poor diet to a lack of exercise could be partially responsible for the onset of cognitive decline. Until now, a definitive connection between some health conditions and dementia has remained elusive. However, the New York Times reports that researchers in the United States believe they have identified a possible connection between high blood sugar and dementia.

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Dementia cases on the decline across the UK

Dementia is one of the most difficult conditions for families, caregivers and elderly people to deal with. Memory loss can rob people of their very identity and make communicating with friends and loved ones very challenging. When elderly people begin to exhibit symptoms of dementia, the best course of action is often to help them move into an assisted living community. Fortunately, according to new research, overall rates of new dementia cases appear to be declining across the UK.

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Hot cocoa may protect against cognitive decline

Hot chocolate has long been a popular beverage for anyone looking for a delicious way to warm up, and new research suggests it may be helping improve their brain's health, as well. The study, performed by scientists from America's Harvard Medical School, suggests drinking two cups of hot cocoa each day could increase blood flow to the brain, according to findings published in the journal Neurology.

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Play chess to stay sharp

For residents of retirement villages and assisted living communities, one enjoyable aspect of everyday life is having the time to engage in hobbies to the full.  As well as being entertaining, playing mentally stimulating games like chess can help older people to keep their minds sharp. Although it may not be immediately apparent, the "game of kings" can have a variety of benefits for older individuals, particularly those at risk of Alzheimer's disease.

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