We use cookies to give you the best possible experience of our website. Some of the cookies we use identify your browsing habits and enable us to show you other content and products relevant to your interests. If you continue, we'll assume you're happy for your web browser to receive all cookies from our website. See our privacy policy for more information on cookies and how to manage them. Close
We use cookies to give you the best possible experience of our website. Some of the cookies we use identify your browsing habits and enable us to show you other content and products relevant to your interests. If you continue, we'll assume you're happy for your web browser to receive all cookies from our website. See our privacy policy for more information on cookies and how to manage them. Close

Sunrise Senior Living Blog

Sunrise Senior Living Blog

Antipsychotic Drugs 'Increase Death Risk In Dementia'

Antipsychotics linked to increased death risk in dementia patients Antipsychotic drugs that are sometimes used as a form of treatment for side effects of dementia may be contributing to a greater risk of death.

A recent study carried out by researchers from the University of Michigan Medical School and the VA Center for Clinical Management Research discovered that these drugs may have detrimental effects. The findings were published in the journal JAMA Psychiatry.

Increased risk of death

The research included the examination of around 91,000 people over the age of 65 living in the USA. Health data from all of the participants who took psychiatric medication were compared with data for patients with similar conditions who didn't take drugs for their behaviour.

The findings showed that the patients who were taking antipsychotics had a greater risk of death than those who weren't. All of the participants using newer medication had an even greater risk. Additional drugs that are frequently taken by Alzheimer's patients were also examined, including antidepressants. In comparison to the antipsychotics, the risk of death wasn't as high, but it was still greater than the risk for patients who didn't take any medication to control their behaviour.

Antipharmaceutical approaches

"The harm associated with using these drugs in dementia patients is clear, yet clinicians continue to use them," said the lead author, Donovan Maust, M.D. "That's likely because the symptoms are so distressing. These results should raise the threshold for prescribing further."

The researchers have proposed a new form of treatment that helps manage behavioural symptoms in a manner that doesn't involve drugs. They're planning to continue the study of psychotropic drugs and determine how they impact upon the risk of death in dementia patients.

Sunrise Senior Living care homes all include an area that is dedicated to people living with dementia. To find a location near you, contact us today. 

Are You Ready for Hayfever Season?

Use these tips to get through allergy season unscathed. The recent bout of warm weather may have been welcomed by many, but not everyone has been eager to get outside and experience all that Spring has to offer.

Read More

Stroke Drug May 'Slow Cognitive Decline'

Scientists find drug that may slow cognitive decline Australian and Chinese researchers are claiming that a drug developed for stroke victims may also be able to slow memory loss.

Read More

Active Social Life 'Reduces Risk Of Cognitive Decline'

Study links social engagement to lower risk of cognitive decline in senior citizens According to recent research, an active social life helps to stimulate older people and reduces feelings of isolation and loneliness.

Read More

Parkinson's Awareness Week Starts Today

Sunrise Senior Living is marking Parkinson's Awareness Week with a number of events. Parkinson's Awareness Week starts today and runs until 26th April, helping to raise awareness of the disease, its effects and the need for more research into its causes.

Read More