We use cookies to give you the best possible experience of our website. Some of the cookies we use identify your browsing habits and enable us to show you other content and products relevant to your interests. If you continue, we'll assume you're happy for your web browser to receive all cookies from our website. See our privacy policy for more information on cookies and how to manage them. Close
We use cookies to give you the best possible experience of our website. Some of the cookies we use identify your browsing habits and enable us to show you other content and products relevant to your interests. If you continue, we'll assume you're happy for your web browser to receive all cookies from our website. See our privacy policy for more information on cookies and how to manage them. Close

Sunrise Senior Living Blog

Sunrise Senior Living Blog

How To Talk To Kids About Dementia

Talking to children about dementia isn't always easy. During the festive season, you and your children may have visited family members living with dementia. If your loved one's condition has worsened since the last time you saw them, your children will probably have noticed and may have started asking you questions. It can be difficult to explain dementia to young children, but talking with them about your relative's condition can help them feel better about the changes taking place. Here are some tips for discussing dementia with your children.

1. Explain the facts
First and foremost, it's important to give your children the facts about dementia diagnoses. Let them know that your relative has a disease, and that is what's causing their symptoms. Depending on the ages of your children, you may be able to go into greater detail and explain what is happening in your loved one's brain that is causing them to forget things or act in certain ways.

Tell your children what they can expect when they visit with their relative so they aren't taken by surprise. It's also important to let younger children know that dementia isn't contagious, and it's not a normal part of ageing. The Alzheimer's Association has a number of helpful videos for children and teenagers that you may wish to watch together.

2. Let them know it's not personal
Your children may be confused, scared or distressed after witnessing your relative's behaviour. They may feel like their loved one is acting out towards them on purpose, or like they did something wrong. Therefore, it's helpful to let your children know that your loved one's behaviour is not their fault. Make sure they know not to take anything personally, and that your relative acts the same way towards everyone because of the disease.

3. Set the example
If your children aren't sure how to act around their relative after learning about their diagnosis, it's up to you to set an example. Show your children the most effective ways to communicate with their loved one, such as using a calm tone of voice accompanied by a gentle touch on the shoulder, if that's what your relative prefers. Your children will be able to see how they can cope with the situation, which can help them feel more confident during visits.

4. Answer questions
Towards the end of your initial discussion, don't forget to ask your children if they have any questions for you. They may be wondering all kinds of things about your loved one - some of which may be difficult to explain. Do your best to answer these questions honestly, but be reassuring. In the end, your children will feel good about the fact that you shared information with them.

At Sunrise Senior Living, our care homes all include dementia care neighbourhoods that look after residents living with many different kinds of cognitive impairment. For more information or to find a location near you, contact us today.

Singing Benefits Memory And Mood

Singing and listening to holiday music can benefit your loved one. Just in time for the festive season, new research has been released that suggests singing and listening to music can be beneficial for people living with early stages of dementia. Researchers from Finland's University of Helsinki have found that carer-implemented musical leisure activities, especially singing, are cognitively and emotionally beneficial in the early stages of dementia. The research was published in the Journal of Alzheimer's Disease.

Read More

9 Tips for Communicating With Someone With Dementia

Show love and compassion when communicating with someone dealing with Alzheimer's. Dementia and Alzheimer's disease play a huge role in decreasing one's ability to communicate. As a carer, you will notice serious changes in communication over time in the person you're caring for. Fortunately, there are many tips in making discussion easier for both of you.

Read More

Lower The Risk of Bowel Cancer

Help Seniors Prevent Bowel Cancer Every year, the UK celebrates December as a time to raise awareness of bowel cancer. One of the most popular campaigns is Decembeard, where men grow their beards to show support for those diagnosed with the disease and raise money for research. 

Read More

Tech-Savvy Students Visit Sunrise Residents

Tech-Savvy Students Visit Sunrise Residents Over the years, people of all ages have become reliant on technology for everyday activities. Modern devices now have the power to shape the minds of the younger generation, which is why so many schools have incorporated technology into the classroom. To show residents how they use technology at school, students from ACS Egham International School in South West London visited Sunrise Senior Living's Virginia Water care home with their iPads.

Read More